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Starting MySQL… ERROR! The server quit without updating PID file


Starting MySQL… ERROR! The server quit without updating PID file

Sometimes you may see this error in your server. But don’t panic, just rename or move away the /etc/my.cnf in your server, and try to restart the MySQLd again.

 

[[email protected]:~ ] $ service mysqld start
Starting MySQL... ERROR! The server quit without updating PID file (/var/lib/mysql/server.pelayan.com.pid).
[[email protected]:~ ] $ mv /etc/my.cnf /etc/my.cnf.old
[[email protected]:~ ] $ service mysqld restart
Shutting down MySQL.... SUCCESS!
Starting MySQL.. SUCCESS!
[[email protected]:~ ] $



Most of the time happen while upgrading MySQL version

Stopping mysqld ...
Shutting down MySQL.... SUCCESS!
Upgrading MySQL 5.0 to 5.5
Preparing...                ########################################### [100%]
   1:MySQL-shared           ########################################### [ 25%]
   2:MySQL-client           ########################################### [ 50%]
   3:MySQL-devel            ########################################### [ 75%]
   4:MySQL-server           ########################################### [100%]
Starting MySQL... ERROR! The server quit without updating PID file (/var/lib/my                                 sql/server.pelayan.com.pid).
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12 thoughts on “Starting MySQL… ERROR! The server quit without updating PID file”

  1. you are retarded. of course it worked, you just zeroed out your configuration to the defaults. ctrl-alt-delete yourself from the surface of the earth

  2. Brad Quellhorst

    The better advice would be “Remove anything you recently added to my.cnf and remove the file as a last resort” Unless you already have a bare-defaults my.cnf, by removing it you’re destroying *any* configuration options in favor of defaults, which among other things, are rather insecure. Binding MySQL to all open IPs and removing any caching, replication, and data information is *not* the solution to a typo’d configuration statement.

  3. Brad Quellhorst

    The better advice would be “Remove anything you recently added to my.cnf and remove the file as a last resort” Unless you already have a bare-defaults my.cnf, by removing it you’re destroying *any* configuration options in favor of defaults, which among other things, are rather insecure. Binding MySQL to all open IPs and removing any caching, replication, and data information is *not* the solution to a typo’d configuration statement.

  4. I can testify that this was the answer. Thank you so much to you and curses to Google for not getting me here sooner :D

    Happy days.

  5. this type of error is very generic, i think it is better practice to check the logfiles to see exactly what went wrong.

  6. Also, check if you have SELinux activated, if so, deactivate SELinux and restarts the machine.

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